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Frequently Asked Questions2020-05-27T11:15:56-05:00

Frequently Asked Questions

Is a shore power converter better than an isolation transformer?
Unlike an isolation transformer a shore power converter enables the yacht to connect to marina power that is different to the yacht’s power, the converter also provides clean power from a poor quality supply whereas a transformer will pass the poor power onto the yacht. A shore power converter provides total separation from the marina electrical power to prevent stray currents and galvanic corrosion.

How does a shore power converter protect all my onboard equipment?
The voltage at the marina pedestal can vary during the day due to power demands of other yachts on the same quay, this voltage change can happen very quickly causing spikes, surges and dips that can damage onboard electrical and electronic equipment. An Atlas shore power converter blocks these damaging voltages by always providing a stable regulated voltage to the yacht.

Do I need a shore converter with two inputs? What is the advantage of two input shore cords? Can I connect two shore power cords to two different voltages?
The Atlas SHF shore power converter maximizes the amount of power you can obtain from the marina by being able to connect to two receptacles of different voltages and phase. Many marinas offer only a single phase receptacle and a three phase receptacle per berth, with a SHF shore power converter you can connect to both at the same time increasing the total power available.

What are proportional shore power inputs? What is the advantage of proportional shore cord inputs?
When two shore cords are connected to marina outlets of different ratings the total amount of power available is limited to the smallest rating. For example when connected to a 50 amp and a 100 amp outlets since the current in the two cords is equal the maximum current available is 100 amps (50 + 50). However, the SHF converter is unique in that it will divide the current in the cords proportionally so more current is taken from the cord connected to the larger breaker. If used in the previous example the available current is now increased to 150 amps enabling more loads to be used onboard.